Specialized Content for Tropical Climate –  Clinicians

Tropical Climates and infections.

Infection? What is it?

The presence of pathogenic organisms in wounds is classified into four levels:
1.    Contamination – organisms do not cause any host reaction;
2.    Colonisation – organisms multiply or initiate a host reaction;
3.    Critical colonisation – organisms multiply, causing delayed wound healing and usually increased pain but no overt host reaction;
4.    Wound infection – deposition and multiplication of organisms in tissue with an associated host reaction

 

Causes

1.    Direct contact – transfer from equipment or the hands of other persons.
You will always wear gloves, mask, and goggles when treating, and change out gloves where blood is present. Before dressing your clients you will change out gloves totally.  You will always glad wrap or use a dressing kit pre prepared per individual clients.

2.    Airborne dispersal – micro-organisms deposited from the air.
Every single client will leave with a dressing and a cover over the treated area from you premises.  You will list this on the patient’s clinical chart.  What you dressed with, ointment or other, and what you covered with, gauze or other.

3.    Self-contamination – migration from the patient’s skin or gastrointestinal tract.
Read out the post care form before you start.  Give the form to the client.
When sterilizing the patient’s skin before you commence, ensure to sterilize a 4 cm area on the skin surrounding the tattoo to endeavor to minimize contaminations.

4.    Soaking and prolonged immersion in water, swimming, spas, saunas, long periods intense exercise, high activity, where perspiration and sweat are excessive, and thus the disturbed skin on the removal site becomes compromised.
Your post care form will advise against all of the above whilst undergoing treatments.

5.    Further injury to the treatment site, friction from clothing, bumping during sleep, or shoes, ladies bra and tank tops, jeans, etc, general aggravation to the site in the early days of the removal, where blisters are present and no hardened scab has yet presented.

6.    A compromised blood infection already present, or compromised immune system perhaps unknown or perhaps already known, yet not disclosed, when the client presents to you for their removal procedure.

7.    Use of an “unknown topical agent or other” during post care, which is not on your postcare list. The client usually will not tell you.  You must adhere to your Post care advice and protocols.  By Law, you are disallowed to give a diagnosis. Only a Medical Practitioner may give a diagnosis and prescribe according to his diagnosis.